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Athletics doping scandal 2015

‘Public opinion is going to move towards the view that all sport is corrupt,’ says Dick Pound after delivering Russia bombshell

Former Wada chief believes Russia is not the only country with a doping problem and athletics not the only sport with a doping problem

PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 10 November, 2015, 9:27am
UPDATED : Wednesday, 11 November, 2015, 8:37am

An international anti-doping commission recommended on Monday that the Russian Athletics Federation be banned from the sport over widespread doping offences - a move that could see the powerhouse Russian team banished from Olympic competition.

Here's what they said:

Dick Pound, former head of World Anti-Doping Agency and author of review: “It’s worse than we thought, it has the effect of factually affecting the results on the field and play and athletes, both in Russia and abroad, are suffering as a result. It maybe a residue of the old Soviet system ... they must stop it and make a new start.

“If they (Russia) do the surgery, and do the therapy, I hope they can get there (Rio de Janeiro) and compete. The idea is not to exclude people from the Olympics but, sometimes, that’s the price you pay. I hope they’ll say this is an opportunity to get rid of the old system, get rid of the old coaches and change their ways.

Watch: Russia athletes face ban for doping offenses

At some point, the Olympic moment and governments will have to say are we going to do this properly or should we all go home?

“Some of the things we found were nasty surprises to us and I think (IAAF president) Sebastian Coe is somebody who can grasp this and be transformational enough to bring some change to athletics. Sport is at risk if he doesn’t.

“I think the credibility of sport has taken some fairly serious body blows in the last few months with Fifa and its particular forms of corruption. And now the IAAF. And these are two of the most important sports in the world. It doesn’t just stop there. Public opinion is going to move towards the view that all sport is corrupt.

“We don’t think Russia is the only country with a doping problem and we don’t think athletics is the only sport with a doping problem.

“At some point, the Olympic moment and governments will have to say are we going to do this properly or should we all go home?

“Kenya has a real problems, it’s been very slow to acknowledge there is a problem, there is apparently some kind of investigation going on as we speak. If they don’t do a good job, somebody else will do a job for them.”

READ MORE: ‘Deeply rooted culture of cheating’ among Russian athletes

IAAF president Sebastian Coe: “The information in Wada’s independent commission’s report is alarming. I have urged the council to start the process of considering sanctions against ARAF. This step has not been taken lightly. We will do whatever it takes to protect the clean athletes and rebuild trust in our sport.”

International Olympic Committee (IOC): “This is a deeply shocking report and very saddening for the world of sport. The IOC trusts that the new leadership of the IAAF with its president Sebastian Coe will draw all the necessary conclusions and will take all the necessary measures.

“In this context, the IOC welcomes the clear commitment expressed by IAAF to do ‘whatever it takes to protect the clean athletes and rebuild trust in our sport’.

“The IOC will also carefully study the report with regard to the Olympic Games. If any infringements on the anti-doping rules by athletes and or their entourage should be established, the IOC will react with its usual zero-tolerance policy.”

Acting head of the Russian Athletics Federation Vadim Zelichenok: “Any suspension should be discussed at the meeting of the IAAF in November. It should be proven that any violations were the fault of the federation and not individual sports people. We should be given a chance to clear our names. It is only a recommendation.”

Nikita Kamaev, executive director of Russia’s anti-doping watchdog Rusada, said the Wada doping allegations against Russia were groundless.

Athletics Australia chief executive Phil Jones:  "The runway clearly is very short to address all the issues that the report calls out. I think given the time between now and the Rio Olympics, it’s very difficult to see that their house is going to be demonstrably in order by the middle of next year.

"I don’t think it’s surprising in any way. It’s difficult to imagine Russia is the only country where there would be anti-doping issues. It would be very surprising if Russia was an island in this regard

United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) CEO Travis Tygart: “USADA applauds the work of the Wada independent commission, led by Mr Pound, in exposing a Russian effort to take over sport through unlawful means.

“The evidence released today demonstrates a shocking level of corruption, and sends a clear message to Russia that they will not be allowed to cheat the world’s athletes and escape justice behind a wall of deception and lies.

“If Russia has created an organised scheme of state-supported doping, then they have no business being allowed to compete on the world stage.”

British Sports Minister Tracey Crouch: “It is an extraordinarily dark day for athletics”

Katharine Merry, British bronze medallist at 400m in Sydney Olympics: “Not ashamed to say upset today ... reading and listening to words that tear into the heart of our sport ... our truly great sport. Sad times.”

Paula Radcliffe, British marathon runner and world record holder: “Just got off plane to catch up on these damning and serious revelations. Too much to address in tweets: bottom line – truth eventually comes.

“Suspected some of this for years but way worse than imagined. Athletics needs to take strong action and move quickly forward in right direction.”

Wada president Craig Reedie: “The independent commission’s report contains a series of findings that will shock and appal athletes and sports fans worldwide, and indeed many issues that highlight very current deficiencies with the anti-doping system in Russia.”

International Centre for Sport Security: “The money laundering, extortion, bribery and corruption allegations that have affected the IAAF have not only further damaged the integrity and credibility of athletics but have underlined the serious and significant governance and integrity challenges now facing sport.”