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Trail running

Six-year-old trail runner shows up her dad in family kayak ‘n’ run race

Hong Kong families take to the trail and water during a family kayak ‘n’ run race, where some competitors are as young as five

PUBLISHED : Saturday, 10 June, 2017, 3:05pm
UPDATED : Sunday, 11 June, 2017, 11:30am

Six-year-old Lucinda Nazer said she was fitter than her dad, as she finished the kayak ‘n’ run race in Tai Tam on Saturday morning.

“This was my first one. I won’t do another. It’s so long,” she said. Lucinda added that the kayaking was especially hard.

Lucinda’s father, David, and teammate for the day, laughed when asked if he had trained for the race.

“This was our first one. I have two other daughters, so this was the dry run before going with the others,” he said.

The race was a pairs event, where mothers or fathers race with their sons or daughters. The teams kayaked for 2 kilometres around Tai Tam Bay, and then ran 3km back to the start.

The atmosphere at the finish line was light hearted and relaxed as families congratulated each other and parents beamed with pride over their tired children. The race is part of an ongoing kayak ‘n’ run series.

All in the family as nine-year-old Hong Kong trail runner keeps her parents playing catch-up

The Salgado family ran in two teams, mother Cindy and daughter Sophie in one team, and father Claudio and son Tiago in another.

Sofie said the kayaking was the hardest part and made her arms tired, but she was proud of her younger brother for finishing his first race. Tiago is only five, with his birthday next week.

“Both of our kids have their own favourite sports. They usually do sports after school and on Saturdays,” Claudio and Cindy said. “Instead of taking more academic related classes besides school, we encourage them to do sports.”

The family event was won by father and son duo Kurt and 13-year-old Taiki Lynn.

Nine-year-old girl upstages the adults at 14km Hong Kong trail running race

“The kayaking was longer than the other races we’ve done, which suited us,” Kurt said. “We took a wrong turn in the run. We hit a river, and knew we’d gone the wrong way. But luckily we had a big enough lead we could turn around and still win.”

Iola Cairns, aged eight, raced with her father Tim. Her sister was also supposed to run, but broke her arm playing on monkey bars.

“It actually took the competitive streak out of the race, which we would have had to deal with if both of them were running,” joked Tim.

Meanwhile, adults competed in a longer race consisting of a 4km kayak, then a 6km run and finished with another 2km kayak.

Vincent Lo, competing in the adult section, said: “Team sprints are great as it is not just about individual capability, but also how runners coordinate as a team, pushing each other to go further.”