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French Open

Djokovic stunned by Thiem in French Open quarters

Former world No 1 from Serbia far from his best as he loses to sixth seed from Austria as Nadal breezes into the semis after opponent retires injured

PUBLISHED : Wednesday, 07 June, 2017, 8:49pm
UPDATED : Wednesday, 07 June, 2017, 10:16pm

Novak Djokovic’s French Open title defence ended with a surprisingly lopsided 7-6 (7-5), 6-3, 6-0 quarter-final loss to sixth-seeded Dominic Thiem of Austria on Wednesday.

A year ago, Djokovic became the first man in nearly a half-century to claim a fourth consecutive major championship and completed a career grand slam at Roland Garros. But his form has dipped considerably since then, and now he has gone four majors in a row without earning a trophy.

“It’s a fact that I’m not playing close to my best,” Djokovic said. “This is a whole new situation that I’m feeling.”

On Wednesday at a windy Court Suzanne Lenglen, Djokovic was out of sorts in so many ways, even before that 20-minute third set in which he won only 8 of 34 points. That was only the second time that Djokovic lost a final set by the score of 6-0 in his 937 career tour-level matches.

“It was not there for me today,” Djokovic said with a sigh.

He wasted two set points in the opener. By the end of the match, he wound up with nearly twice as many unforced errors, 35, as winners, 18. His backhand was particularly problematic.

Known for tremendous footwork and court coverage, the No. 2-seeded Serb even stumbled and tumbled to the court, his racquet flying out of his hands, early in the second set. Djokovic was left on his knees, and soon he would be out of the tournament entirely.

“All in all,” Djokovic said, “it was decided, I think, in the first set.”

How unlikely was this result? Djokovic entered the day having won all five previous matches – and 11 of 12 sets – against Thiem, including in the French Open semi-finals a year ago.

“It’s amazing for me,” Thiem said. “To beat him for the first time in the quarters of the French Open is a dream.”

Plus, Djokovic had appeared in a record six consecutive semi-finals in Paris. But this continued what has become something of a 12-month downward slide for him since he finally grabbed ahold of the French Open championship he had so long sought.

Since then, though, the highlight for Djokovic was a runner-up finish at the US Open. Otherwise, he lost his No 1 ranking to Andy Murray and lost in the third round of Wimbledon, the first round of the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, and the second round of the Australian Open.

Along the way, he split with one of his coaches, Boris Becker, and then his other, Marian Vajda, along with other members of his entourage. Djokovic enlisted Andre Agassi for coaching help during week one of the French Open, but Agassi had some prior commitments and so was gone by the time Djokovic faced Thiem.

The 23-year-old Thiem will face nine-time French Open champion Rafael Nadal next.

“You have to play the best guys round after round,” Thiem said. “It’s not getting easier on Friday.”

The other men’s quarter-finals scheduled for later Wednesday: 2016 runner-up Murray v No. 8 Kei Nishikori, and 2015 champion Stan Wawrinka v No. 7 Marin Cilic.

Thiem is a talented, up-and-coming player, to be sure, and he is the only man to beat Nadal in the Spaniard’s 23 matches on clay in 2017. That came in the quarter-finals of the Italian Open last month.

Earlier on Wednesday, Nadal reached his record 10th French Open semi-final when No 20 Pablo Carreno Busta of Spain retired from their match early in the second set because of an injured abdominal muscle he said began bothering him on a serve at 5-2 in the first.

Nadal led 6-2, 2-0 when Carreno Busta stopped.

Nadal has dropped only 22 games so far in the tournament, the fewest he has lost on the way to any of his 26 grand slam semi-final berths.

“I don’t know how many games I lost this year, but I really don’t care about this, no?” Nadal said. “I only care that I am in the semi-finals.”