Cancer | South China Morning Post
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  • Mar 28, 2015
  • Updated: 5:44pm

Cancer

Help inspires hope

The saying 'misfortunes never come singly' is an apt description of Ng Kam-mui's life in recent years. First, her husband fell victim to cancer and became so depressed he killed himself. Not long after that, Ng herself was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Sunday, 17 June, 2012, 12:00am

Help inspires hope

The saying 'misfortunes never come singly' is an apt description of Ng Kam-mui's life in recent years. First, her husband fell victim to cancer and became so depressed he killed himself. Not long after that, Ng herself was diagnosed with breast cancer.

17 Jun 2012 - 12:00am

Recovery of dying cells may help in treating cancer

Normal cells become cancerous after being brought back from the brink of suicide, Chinese University researchers have found in a groundbreaking study that may lead to new cancer treatments.

15 Jun 2012 - 12:00am

Doctors join forces to cut soaring lung cancer toll

Doctors dealing with lung cancer on the mainland, the world's largest consumer and producer of tobacco, have set up the first association focused on battling the disease and its causes.

1 May 2012 - 12:00am

Learning how to give back

Like many students, Hong Kong International Schoolers Maude Latour and Olivia Cherry enjoy raising money for those in need. Their idea to help other children led to a campaign which raised nearly HK$12,000 for cancer sufferers in Hong Kong.

The two Girl Scouts were asked to submit their plans for an 'action project' last September.

27 Apr 2012 - 12:00am

Screened to be believed

In a span of four years, three of six siblings in the Wong family were diagnosed with either breast or ovarian cancer. All three carried a hereditary mutation in the genes known as BRCA, which increases the risk for both diseases - although BRCA is named after the first two letters of 'breast' and 'cancer'.

17 Apr 2012 - 12:00am

China and Europe partner to study cancer treatment

Chinese and European medical institutions have launched a joint project to study cancer immunotherapy, the use of the immune system to eradicate cancer.

The treatment, which stimulates the immune system to attack cancerous cells, has drawn widespread global attention over the past two decades but has achieved limited clinical success.

3 Apr 2012 - 12:00am