• Wed
  • Nov 26, 2014
  • Updated: 11:19pm

Chinese Literature

Martial arts novelist Louis Cha earns doctorate from Peking University, say reports

Hong Kong novelist Louis Cha Leung-yung – who wrote The Legend of the Condor Heroes and is better known by his pen name Jin Yong – will be adding another doctorate to his long list of scholarly and literary achievements, said mainland media reports.

Wednesday, 5 June, 2013, 2:51pm 2 comments

Talking points

Li Keqiang continues his first international tour as premier, arriving in Islamabad for discussions with the new leaders of Beijing's traditional South Asian ally, Pakistan.

22 May 2013 - 2:53am

Louis Cha's martial arts classic to become 'required reading' for Beijing pupils

Cha's masterpiece, Legend of the Condor Heroes, is to be added to the Chaoyang district library’s list of selected readings along with Harry Potter and the Complete Works of William Shakespeare.

2 Apr 2013 - 6:30pm 2 comments

Mo Yan walks delicate line on his way to collect Nobel literature prize

China's Nobel literature winner, Mo Yan, headed to Sweden yesterday to collect his award, but he walks a delicate line with the authorities and is expected to avoid mentioning his jailed fellow laureate Liu Xiaobo.

6 Dec 2012 - 4:04am

China: 'This Generation' by Han Han

Han Han is such an outsized personality in China, with millions of Chinese hanging on to his every word, that it is easy to forget he is still virtually unknown in the West.

28 Oct 2012 - 4:33pm

Writers should be true to their convictions

I still remember that afternoon more than 20 years ago when I first read Red Sorghum. I was bowled over. I hadn't yet come across the works of William Faulkner or Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and as I read Red Sorghum then, I felt a rush of elation that a story about "my grandfather" and "my grandmother" could be told so boldly and without restraint.

22 Oct 2012 - 2:52am 1 comment

Separating fact from fiction about Mo Yan

A widely circulated Sina Weibo post, sardonically linking Nobel laureate Mo Yan to two more controversial Chinese celebrities, perhaps best illustrated the public's conflicted feelings about the media frenzy surrounding the writer's award.

21 Oct 2012 - 1:39am 4 comments

Materialism a threat to China's literary culture, fears Wang Anyi

With more than 60 literary works under her belt, Shanghai-based author Wang Anyi is regarded as one of the most prolific and influential writers in contemporary China.

28 Oct 2012 - 4:52pm

Mo's works in line with Nobel vision

As expected, Beijing celebrated Mo Yan's award of the Nobel Prize for literature as a national triumph. Also unsurprisingly, though, critics and activists have questioned whether Mo's Communist Party membership qualifies him for the honour and whether the Swedish Academy sent the right message to the Chinese regime by honouring him.

18 Oct 2012 - 2:29am

'Wishful thinking' to link Mo Yan's Nobel prize with China's rise

The awarding of the 2012 Nobel Prize for literature to Mo Yan is a great recognition of Chinese literary talent, but for the government to say it symbolises China's "soft power" and rising influence is wishful thinking, critics say.

14 Oct 2012 - 9:43am 4 comments

Mo Yan's Nobel means recognition for China at last, but critics air doubts

Mo Yan's Nobel Prize for literature was hailed by the public as a sign that contemporary Chinese literature has finally won global recognition, even as several cultural critics questioned the value of his work.

12 Oct 2012 - 7:30am

Mo Yan: a dark satirist who tells the 'big stories of China'

Mo Yan has come far from Gaomi, where he was born to a farming family in the early days of communist rule, but his writing has never left.

12 Oct 2012 - 7:55pm

Media frenzy over author Mo Yan's chance to win Nobel Prize

Critically acclaimed for his work and faulted for his tolerance of government censors, Chinese author Mo Yan has suddenly found himself at the centre of a media frenzy over his prospects of winning the Nobel Prize.

10 Oct 2012 - 4:30am

Pauline Chen reworks a classic of Chinese literature

In this modern adaptation of the 18th-century Chinese classic Dream of the Red Chamber, life for the aristocratic characters is described as akin to an "elaborate web": exquisite but also a trap.

17 Sep 2012 - 9:28am

A matter of time

Book agents seldom get the glory. Authors earn the accolades, and publishers reap the biggest financial rewards (or at least, they used to), while agents remain mostly anonymous emissaries, known only within the publishing world.

19 Feb 2012 - 12:00am

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