• Mon
  • Apr 21, 2014
  • Updated: 10:56am

Ching Ming Festival

Ching Ming respect for the dead … and Louis Vuitton

Hundreds of thousands of people paid tribute to the dead during the Ching Ming "grave-sweeping" festival yesterday but there was a whiff of change in the air amid the smoke of burning offerings and incense.

Friday, 5 April, 2013, 3:57am

Where the living face rocketing costs to bury the dead

People on the mainland are finding death as unaffordable as life as prices of urns and graves soar. A funeral supplies store at Beijing's Babaoshan graveyard now charges between 4,100 and 12,300 yuan (HK$5,100 and HK$15,400), The Beijing News reported. One carved white jade urn fetched a whopping 119,850 yuan.

5 Apr 2013 - 4:44am

How QR codes are adding a load more memory to loved ones' memorials

Some canny mainlanders have discovered a way to liven up their trips to the cemetery with a bit of modern technology. Those visiting tombs of relatives during today's Ching Ming grave-sweeping festival may be surprised to see others at nearby graves huddled around a mobile phone, possibly shedding a tear - or having a good laugh.

4 Apr 2013 - 11:07am

Talking points

China Guardian Auctions, a mainland auction house specialising in Chinese artwork, will hold a two-day Spring Auction Sale Series of ceramics, painting and calligraphy including Hong Kong ink paintings at the Island Shangri-La in Central.

4 Apr 2013 - 3:17am

Urgency needed to end columbarium confusion

The severe shortage of columbariums which meet legal requirements is a problem that requires urgent action. The measures adopted by the government do not go far enough. Officials are moving slowly when they should be acting decisively and swiftly. Rules are weak and poorly enforced and proposed laws remain at a rudimentary stage.

12 Apr 2011 - 12:00am

Expensive offerings a grave problem

Inflationary pressures gripped grave-sweepers during the Ching Ming Festival last week. Offerings were getting so expensive the ancestors might turn in their graves if they knew, one grave sweeper complained.

9 Apr 2008 - 12:00am

Ching Ming festival, once branded superstition, is revived as holiday

The mainland observes the Ching Ming festival, or grave-sweeping day, today as a public holiday for the first time in its modern history.

The central government decided to cut back the week-long May Day break in November and make national holidays out of three traditional festivals. The others are the Dragon Boat festival in June and the Mid-Autumn Festival in September.

4 Apr 2008 - 12:00am

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