Cryptography

Cracks in the code: Encryption may be flimsy armour

You're putting in your credit card details to make an online purchase. As you type in your card number, you feel slightly uneasy about sending it into cyberspace.

Sunday, 1 July, 2012, 12:00am

Underdog becomes king of the scramblers

Cheung Chau may be famed for its legends of buried pirate treasure and sumptuous seafood, but it is an annual scramble for plastic buns that attracts most attention.

The midnight race attracted just over 200 applicants this year, who battled it out in a series of heats earlier this month before the final 12 competitors were selected.

29 Apr 2012 - 12:00am

Code breaking

Speaking in riddles

If you have something to tell someone and you don't want anyone else to know what it is, you can use a code. A code is information that has been disguised. You need a 'key' to work out what it means.

The art of breaking codes is called cryptanalysis. Many codes from the past have been cracked by experts.

9 Jun 2010 - 12:00am

Police go virtual to plug file leaks

The Hong Kong Police Force aims to set up a secure network for remote access to its database to stop officers inadvertently leaking data onto the internet. It will ask lawmakers to approve funding for the system, which is projected to cost HK$400 million.

5 Jan 2010 - 12:00am

Security order to HK banks after virus used to rob online accounts

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority has ordered banks to step up internet-banking security after thieves took money from people's accounts by using a virus to steal their login details.

The authority is aware of three such cases, involving HK$289,000. Eight banks have reported being targeted since April.

14 Jul 2009 - 12:00am

Signatures not forged, expert says

The signature of Nina Wang Kung Yu-sum on a will held by Tony Chan Chun-chuen displayed 44 characteristics resembling her previous signatures that could cancel out all 15 discrepancies spotted, a handwriting expert said yesterday.

19 Jun 2009 - 12:00am

Quantum leap claimed in tighter internet security

The device resting comfortably in Guo Guangcan's hands may have an unassuming name - it is called a quantum router - but the Chinese Academy of Sciences member says it has the potential to make military and civilian communication systems impregnable.

8 May 2007 - 12:00am

Screening out cyber-crime

Two-factor authentication and e-Certs have made internet trading much safer

LINGERING SECURITY concerns continue to keep some retail investors away from online trading platforms. But industry practitioners say such concerns might be excessive, considering the presence of 'two-factor authentication' and 'e-Cert' digital certificates.

30 Jul 2006 - 12:00am

KEEPING SECRETS

Top-secret data stays that way with the FlagStone range of fully encrypted hard drives from British firm Stonewood. Distributed in Hong Kong by risk management and consultancy group I-OnAsia (www.ionasia.com.hk), the drives provide continuous encryption and decryption so that data remains secure.

21 Mar 2006 - 12:00am

ESC sequences

Enigma machine - in paper

5 Jul 2005 - 12:00am

Banks demand e-Cert use for Net transactions

Twelve banks and financial institutions are requiring their customers to use e-Cert, a digital certificate issued by Hongkong Post, for authentication in conducting transactions over the internet.

24 Jun 2005 - 12:00am

Vigilance is vital for online banking safety

IF YOU DO your banking online, you will probably never go back to your old ways.

5 May 2005 - 12:00am

E-signatures get stamp of approval

New legislation allows for business transactions to be sealed online

Electronic signatures will carry the same legal weight as seals and handwritten signatures in business transactions on the mainland from April.

30 Aug 2004 - 12:00am

Accounts protected by online security boost

Hong Kong's banks are stepping up online-banking security measures to safeguard customers' accounts, even if criminals gain access to their login names and passwords.

The new system is known as two-factor authentication. It requires a password and something to access the account, such as an electronic certificate.

9 Aug 2004 - 12:00am

Regulations sell e-business short

World-class information technology infrastructure and a sound legal process are often cited as reasons why companies should come to Hong Kong. But, where the two meet in the area of laws governing electronic business transactions, the territory appears to have fallen behind its supposedly less sophisticated neighbour Guangdong.

31 May 2004 - 12:00am

Pages