• Sat
  • Nov 1, 2014
  • Updated: 2:03am

Direct Marketing

Public backed ordinance changes

I refer to L. Chang's letter ("People should have opt-in choice over personal data", April 16). The Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data and the government undertook a review of the ordinance from 2009-2010, in the light of experience gained since it came into operation in 1996. One area reviewed was the regulation of the use of personal data in direct marketing.

Tuesday, 23 April, 2013, 3:51am

Opt-out rights a cause for celebration

As the chairman of the Hong Kong Direct Marketing Association I feel obligated to respond to the letter by L. Chang and the report by Enoch Yiu. Both writers have misunderstood the newly amended privacy ordinance and the prior ordinance which had been in force for many years.

19 Apr 2013 - 2:48am

Back to sales basics as privacy rules take effect

Insurance companies will cut back on direct marketing as they confront new privacy rules on the use and sale of customer information, according to the head of a major firm.

15 Apr 2013 - 3:43am

The last-minute dash for data by phone companies

Mobile phone service providers are making a last-minute rush to collect as much personal data as possible before a tighter law on direct-sales tactics comes into effect on April 1.

27 Mar 2013 - 5:41am

Marketing scheme cause for concern

It is ironic that promoters of a marketing scheme banned on the mainland can get around the law by drawing tens of thousands of people to visit Hong Kong to sign up for it. To reassure them about the legality of this, a senior instructor tells them that the Hong Kong police even send officers to help maintain order when there are long queues of new applicants outside sales centres.

25 Jul 2012 - 12:00am

Trapped to 'get rich'

A magic lamp promising health and wealth has captured the hearts of tens of thousands of mainland visitors flocking to Hong Kong on 'business inspection trips'.

11 Jul 2012 - 12:00am

Fraudsters' new scam snares job seekers

Anxious job seekers are being warned of a new scam in which their identity cards may be used to obtain loans or to buy iPhones.

Some victims even face prosecution after being duped into using false documents to get loans, police say.

Eighteen people fell victim to such scams in the first three months of this year, compared with 13 over the same period last year.

28 May 2012 - 12:00am

Fear privacy law delay will be abused

The privacy watchdog has expressed concerns that a 10-month grace period the banking industry is seeking to prepare for tighter laws on direct sales tactics will be exploited.

Privacy Commissioner Allan Chiang Yam-wang agreed a grace period was necessary to help the industry take steps for an amended privacy law.

27 Apr 2012 - 12:00am

'Joining' pyramid scheme is a crime

People who join pyramid schemes could find themselves in court as well as out of pocket under a new law which took effect this month.

Under Hong Kong's 30-year-old Pyramid Selling Prohibition Ordinance, only the masterminds behind pyramid selling schemes - in which participants hand over cash and must recruit more members in order to profit - could be prosecuted.

16 Jan 2012 - 12:00am

Estate agents' watchdog gets tougher on protecting clients' data

From next month, all estate agent branches must keep an up-to-date list of clients who have opted out of being approached for direct marketing.

Their managers can be held responsible if this and other privacy rules are breached.

Penalities after a disciplinary hearing can be as severe as an agent's licence being revoked.

21 Sep 2011 - 12:00am

Novelist digs deep to expose pyramid scam

Popular writer Murong Xuecun, 36, who made a name for himself with three gritty bestsellers on contemporary urban life in China - Leave Me Alone: A Novel of Chengdu, Dancing Through Red Dust and Paradise to the Left and Shenzhen to the Right, recently published a non-fiction book on his undercover investigation of a pyramid-sales organisation.

2 Jan 2011 - 12:00am

Stiff penalties proposed for pyramid scam schemes

Con artists running pyramid schemes face the prospect of up to seven years in jail and a HK$1 million fine under proposed law changes.

Hong Kong's Pyramid Selling Prohibition Ordinance has not been updated for 30 years and its effectiveness has been eroded by new tactics in changing economic times, resulting in acquittals in some cases.

8 Dec 2010 - 12:00am

A call worth answering - protecting privacy

The ringing of a telephone used to be straightforward - a family member or a colleague calling to share interesting news or perhaps an amusing story. Friends still call, but these days the anticipation you feel when you get an identified number in the middle of the day is more likely to be one of dread.

25 Nov 2010 - 12:00am

Pyramid law update to cast a wider net

A tougher law against pyramid schemes is likely to be passed in the first half of next year.

Commerce minister Rita Lau Ng Wai-lan outlined the first update of the ordinance in 30 years to a panel of lawmakers yesterday. And she invited comment on whether participants in such schemes, not just their promoters, should be held to have committed a criminal offence.

26 Oct 2010 - 12:00am

Clear the fog away from fine-print agreements

The troubled Octopus Card's tentacles have entangled the entire direct marketing industry. Following the scandal over the sale of personal details of more than a million Octopus clients to business partners, the government proposes making such abuse of privacy a criminal offence and holding businesses more accountable for use of consumers' data.

22 Oct 2010 - 12:00am

Pages