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Euro Zone Crisis

The euro zone crisis was triggered in 2009 when Greece's debts, left by its previous government, reached a record 300 billion euros, leaving the southern European economy with debt levels more than four times higher as a proportion of gross domestic product than the official euro zone cap of 60 per cent of GDP. Since the original problems were uncovered, Greece has been bailed out twice, and lenders have also had to rescue Ireland and Portugal. In the latter half of 2012. Cyprus also required a bailout.

 
An anti-austerity protester burns a euro note during a demonstration outside the European Union (EU) offices in Athens, Greece June 28, 2015. Greece said it may impose capital controls and keep its banks shut on Monday after creditors refused to extend the country's bailout and savers queued to withdraw cash, taking Athens' standoff with the European Union and the International Monetary Fund to a dangerous new level. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis

Is it going to be game over for the euro this year?

Things seem to have gone very quiet around the euro currency in recent months. It appears to have found some much needed stability after years of extreme market mayhem with its very survival on the line at times as the euro zone has lurched from one crisis to another.