Festivals in China | South China Morning Post
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  • Jan 31, 2015
  • Updated: 12:13am

Festivals in China

Parade to offer all singing, all dancing hello to Year of the Snake

The Lunar New Year Fireworks display will draw oohs and aahs next Monday night.

Thirty-six floats and performing groups from 14 countries will take part in the Chinese New Year Night Parade in Tsim Sha Tsui next Sunday.

Sunday, 3 February, 2013, 5:36am

Revellers set shining examples

Revellers and fun-seekers packed into Victoria Park last night for the lantern carnival to celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival, the most important festival and occasion for family reunions after the Lunar New Year.

The moon, which was for most of the time veiled by thin cloud, faced competition from hundreds of beautifully crafted lanterns that brightened up the park.

13 Sep 2011 - 12:00am

Gallic breadth

It's still early April, but Le French May is almost upon us. The annual celebration of all things French begins on April 15 and continues until June 23. This makes the title something of a misnomer, but after 19 years it is probably too late to rechristen.

5 Apr 2011 - 12:00am

Cry for the moon

According to the Chinese lunar calendar, autumn occurs during the seventh, eighth and ninth lunar months. Hence, the 15th day of the eighth month marks the Mid-Autumn Festival, which, this year, falls on Tuesday. Also known as the Mooncake or Lantern Festival, the mid-autumn day was used to celebrate the season's harvest in ancient China.

23 Sep 2007 - 12:00am

Weather fails to douse festive spirit

Clouds and rain block view of full moon, but thousands flock to the five lantern festivals around the city

Mid-Autumn revellers braved last night's inclement weather hoping to catch a glimpse of the full moon in Victoria Park, but it was hidden behind thick clouds that soaked people with sudden showers.

19 Sep 2005 - 12:00am

Have Your Say

Teacher suicides make us reflect

The recent double teacher suicide was shocking news to many people.

Most of us see teachers as model adults that students should to try to be like.

We expect teachers to be righteous, responsible and virtuous.

16 Sep 2005 - 12:00am

Carnivals light up the city

A number of lantern carnivals are being held across Hong Kong to mark the Mid-Autumn Festival. Besides creative lantern displays, the programmes include music and dance performances, and fortune-telling. Among the offerings:

Hong Kong Island Mid-Autumn Lantern Carnival

Sunday, Victoria Park

16 Sep 2005 - 12:00am

All light on the night

COLOURFUL STARFRUIT, rabbits, goldfish and traditional paper lanterns jostle for space in storefronts, as Hong Kong prepares for Sunday's annual Mid-Autumn Festival.

While battery-lit, plastic lanterns in the shape of popular cartoon characters have dominated the scene during the past decade, this year people are opting for more traditional designs.

16 Sep 2005 - 12:00am

Enchanting festival of lights

If you are wondering what to do over the Mid-Autumn Festival, you might want to visit one of the colourful lantern carnivals organised by the Leisure and Cultural Services Department.

You can admire the lanterns at Ko Shan Road Park, Ko Shan Theatre and Tai Po Waterfront Park on Saturday, at Victoria Park on Sunday and at Tsing Yi Park on Monday.

13 Sep 2005 - 12:00am

Lantern festival turns HK into city of lights

'We especially wanted to be here this year. There has been too much bad news and we need to celebrate and have fun'

Victoria Park was ablaze with lantern lights last night as thousands of lovers, families and tourists descended on Hong Kong's largest Mid-Autumn Festival carnival.

12 Sep 2003 - 12:00am

'World's biggest' lantern to loom over Mid-Autumn festivities

35 metres wide and 15 metres tall, it will light up Victoria Park

The Mid-Autumn Festival is going to extremes this year, with what organisers hope will be the construction of the world's largest lantern. The Hong Kong Tourism Board is building the lantern in Victoria Park as part of the annual festivities.

6 Sep 2003 - 12:00am

Expectations on a theme

THE CULTURAL SCENE in Hong Kong has experienced one of its worst years - Sars practically annihilated the Le French May festival and two months of programming was wiped clean from the city's theatres.

10 Aug 2003 - 12:00am

Waxing lyrical over festive moongazing

How did you celebrate this year's Mid-Autumn Festival? A group of students from Wong Shiu Chi Secondary School went moongazing and came up with the following poems that they want to share with other Young Post readers.

A Warm Night

Children are playing around

Couples are chatting arm in arm

This night, a dragon wakes up to find

3 Oct 2001 - 12:00am

Annual month-long event offers glimpse of life in France

Amonth-long programme is being held at various locations in Hong Kong to promote French culture.

The annual 'Le French May' is organised and presented by the French Consul General in the SAR in collaboration with Alliance Francaise de Hong Kong.

This year a number of government departments and local arts organisations are also taking part in the programme.

7 May 2001 - 12:00am

Traditional events start with drinking soup of the eighth day

The New Year provides a chance to discard past misfortunes and to start afresh. Below is a sequence of traditional events from the 12th moon.

12th Moon Day 8: Offering of labazhou (soup of the eighth day).

Day 23 or 24: Kitchen God ascends to Heaven.

4 Feb 2000 - 12:00am

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