G.O.D. | South China Morning Post
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  • Mar 4, 2015
  • Updated: 6:47am

G.O.D.

G.O.D. founders' new retail venture is provocative as ever

Little things like a police raid and the threat of jail aren't going to stop the troublemakers at G.O.D.

Monday, 28 January, 2008, 12:00am

Bail extended for store workers

Eighteen people from the lifestyle chain G.O.D., including founder Douglas Young, had their bail extended when they reported to police yesterday. The 18 people were arrested on November 1 for selling T-shirts and postcards printed with the Chinese characters for '14K' - the name of a triad society.

16 Nov 2007 - 12:00am

Artists' exhibition to tackle taboo over 14K

More than 30 artists are planning an exhibition on Saturday to defend their right to express cultural views, following this month's police raid and arrests at the lifestyle chain G.O.D. and the seizure of T-shirts printed with the Chinese characters for '14K', the name of a triad society.

13 Nov 2007 - 12:00am

G.O.D. boss sorry for '14K' T-shirts

We were not aware that the graphic design could be linked to triads, says retail store owner

The owner of retail chain G.O.D. apologised yesterday for 'causing misunderstanding' by selling T-shirts and postcards bearing the Chinese characters for '14K' - which is the name of a triad gang.

3 Nov 2007 - 12:00am

Store 'a victim of media publicity'

G.O.D. manager expresses shock at police raid following newspaper report

The lifestyle chain that landed in hot water yesterday for selling T-shirts bearing the name of a triad society said it was a victim of unwanted media publicity.

2 Nov 2007 - 12:00am

Made in Hong Kong

IF G.O.D. STANDS for goods of desire in English, when pronounced in Cantonese it sounds like living well. And that is just what co-founders of this lifestyle store, Douglas Young and Benjamin Lau, had in mind when they conceived of the enterprise 12 years ago.

27 May 2006 - 12:00am

Don't delay, you too can swear like a local today

It's curious that people say 'swear like a sailor' when, from my own experience, it might be more apt to say 'swear like a hack'. Other professions are not so forgiving about the use of such words in the workplace.

8 Oct 2005 - 12:00am