• Tue
  • Jul 29, 2014
  • Updated: 1:14pm

Higher Education in China

NYU Shanghai as a study in globalisation

The founding chancellor of New York University Shanghai, Yu Lizhong, likens the joint venture between New York University and East China Normal University to a couple expecting a child.

Sunday, 26 May, 2013, 2:53pm

Record 1.8m postgrad hopefuls sit national entrance exams

A record 1.8 million students across China spent the first week of the new year taking the National Entrance Examinations for Postgraduates, state media reported on Sunday.

7 Jan 2013 - 5:49pm

Quality control

When The New York Times recently ran a major story about China becoming the world's second-greatest producer of science papers after the US, the subtext was not lost on its readers. Besides challenging the United States as the pre-eminent economic power, China is also becoming a science powerhouse. What the article did not say is that quantity does not equate to quality.

18 Mar 2010 - 12:00am

Treating education as a serious business

Since the 1980s, Hong Kong has become famous for four industries: financial services, tourism, shipping and professional services.

But because of keen competition from other parts of Asia, the city now needs to invest more in its education services.

Technology and knowledge are becoming increasingly important to the global economy.

4 Mar 2010 - 12:00am

Mainland prepares to open its doors to foreign collaborators

China is penning laws on educational collaboration between mainland and overseas institutions as it prepares to open its education market to the world, a senior education official said.

28 Sep 2002 - 12:00am

Mainland academics demand greater autonomy and funding

Demands are rising for more independence and wider sources of funding for mainland universities, according to a new publication on higher education in China released this week by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

3 Feb 2001 - 12:00am

Universities open to more students

The Government has greatly expanded university enrolment this year, hoping it will increase the pool of professional talent and boost domestic consumption.

But a shortage of accommodation and teaching facilities might affect the reform plan.

12 Jul 1999 - 12:00am