• Thu
  • Aug 21, 2014
  • Updated: 7:19pm

Languages of the United Kingdom

One tongue, many voices: a lesson in the power of diversity

My daughter goes to an international school and English is not her first language. She says that she finds some of her teachers hard to understand.

Sunday, 18 December, 2011, 12:00am

Slang adds richness to language but it don't travel well, bro

There has recently been more debate about the optimal type of English to be used by teachers in Hong Kong's schools. Providing English classes in our schools cannot be intended simply to enable local children to speak just like their teachers as an end in itself.

16 Feb 2008 - 12:00am

Do native English speakers make better teachers?

Jeff Lu, 16 Phillips Academy, Andover

Yes. Native English speakers are naturals in the language and make better teachers in an English-language class.

Hong Kong students want to be confident in their spoken English, and so want to speak with fluent English speakers. Their concern is speaking English, not so much reading and writing English.

6 Aug 2007 - 12:00am

WORLDBEAT

What's going on around the globe

Most people don't know much about Wales. I do, even though I'm English. My girlfriend is Welsh, and seems to hold me responsible for the English invasion that's said to have ruined the country - even though it was more than 800 years before I was born. In effect, Wales lost its independence about 1282 ... and has been suffering ever since.

9 Apr 2006 - 12:00am

Letters

Teachers' accents

I wish to voice my opinion about why students in Hong Kong find it difficult to learn to speak English well.

Teachers of English in Hong Kong all use different accents. Some have a British accent, others an American accent, and still others a Canadian accent, and there are those whose accents are hard to identify.

2 Apr 2004 - 12:00am

Comprehending Estuary English

It may be the most widely spoken language in the world but even if you are a fluent English speaker don't expect to understand what the natives are saying if you visit the British Isles.

A new phrasebook intended to help visitors to Britain warns never to take at face value what an Englishman says and not to be surprised to find his speech littered with four-letter words.

27 Jul 1999 - 12:00am