LIFE

LIFE

SCMP's Life section takes a broad view of culture and covers issues including the environment, community affairs and human interest stories. Mondays are dedicated to Fashion, Health and Education. Tuesdays focus on Fitness and Wellbeing, Arts and Entertainment, and Family. Fridays cover Food and Wine, Technology and Design and Luxury.  

Book review: Almost Famous Women - engaging portraits

Book review: Almost Famous Women - engaging portraits

The women in Megan Mayhew Bergman's vivid new collection live just outside the limelight. Once, they had heydays - of a sort: on stage; on screen; on the battlefield; in front of a canvas. But as their modest lights fade, what's left is disappointment, bitterness and bravado.

Saturday, 17 January, 2015, 10:20pm

E-book and audiobook reviews: Brandon Sanderson, James Patterson, Lesley Glaister

E-book and audiobook reviews: Brandon Sanderson, James Patterson, Lesley Glaister

British novelist Lesley Glaister has enjoyed a fine 12 months. She was one of eight winners of the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize, and has now seen much of her back catalogue released for audio download. Her most recent book, Little Egypt, is an ideal place to begin your Glaister explorations.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

E-book and audiobook reviews: Anthony Russell, James Woodall, Atul Gawande

E-book and audiobook reviews: Anthony Russell, James Woodall, Atul Gawande

Fans of Upstairs, Downstairs-style period dramas about the British aristocracy should enjoy this memoir by Anthony Russell of the privileged lifestyle into which he was born in 1952.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Wong Kar-wai book considers his films as artworks rather than socio-cultural indicators - book review

In The Sensuous Cinema of Wong Kar-wai, Gary Bettinson looks at four aspects of the Hong Kong director's filmmaking. Photo: Corbis

As one of Hong Kong's most written-about filmmakers, Wong Kar-wai may not be an obvious subject for yet another book. But as scholar Gary Bettinson points out in The Sensuous Cinema of Wong Kar-wai, the culturalist approach - which looks for correlations between films and social phenomena - in writing about the director has left room for more fundamental film analysis.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Book review: The Miniaturist - bygone era comes to life in assured debut

Book review: The Miniaturist - bygone era comes to life in assured debut

Much was expected of 32-year-old Jessie Burton's debut novel, which landed her a "six-figure" deal from Picador and was Waterstones' book of the year. It's certainly delivered in terms of sales, but does the book live up to the hype?

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Paris' new concert hall is radical in design, acoustics and location

The Philharmonie de Paris is still under construction. Photo: AFP

Paris is known for its many Belle Epoque cultural landmarks - ornate museums, gilded theatres, the stately Eiffel Tower. But its brand-new concert hall that has just opened comes from a different era.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Cuba-US cultural exchanges set to expand with thaw in bilateral relations

A mosaic in Havana created by Jose Rodriguez Fuster.

The US-Cuba thaw should broaden the already existing cultural links, writes Carolina Miranda.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

American Sniper: Bradley Cooper and writer Jason Hall talk about Chris Kyle, film's protagonist

Bradley Cooper as Chris Kyle in American Sniper.

'American Sniper' star Bradley Cooper tells Rebecca Keegan about the compelling need to honour sharpshooter Chris Kyle.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm 1 comment

Philip K. Dick's The Man in the High Castle - what ifthe Nazis had won the war?

Philip K. Dick's The Man in the High Castle - what ifthe Nazis had won the war?

Many of us are fascinated by the reclusive author: the literary sage who produces one work every few decades, holed up in a dusty castle of old books, worn-out typewriters and crumpled pages. J.D. Salinger, Harper Lee, Thomas Pynchon, Emily Dickinson - the concept has become almost a badge of honour for many a writer.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

John Boorman's Excalibur - a wonderfully mythical realisation of legend

Excalibur

Castles don't get any more magnificent than King Arthur's Camelot, home of the mythical British king and his Knights of the Round Table. That towering edifice is beautifully rendered in British director John Boorman's rendering of Thomas Malory's medieval romance tale Le Morte D'Arthur. Boorman locates the castle somewhere between reality and dream: it's solid enough to appear worldly, yet strange and shimmering enough to evoke the realm of the supernatural.

 

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

CD reviews

CD reviews

American composer Danny Elfman has scored all but two of director Tim Burton’s quirky and darkly macabre fantasies.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

U2's Unforgettable Fire album shows a band finding their mature voice

U2's Unforgettable Fire album shows a band finding their mature voice

The Unforgettable Fire, U2's fourth studio album, was recorded in a castle, the magnificent Slane, since used as a concert venue by just about every Western pop and rock megastar alive.

 

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Videogame review: Super Mega Baseball combines retro and modern features

Super Mega Baseball

January is gaming's dry season, a slow period in which players are still getting through the multitude of complex Christmas offerings. But for those desperate for a fix, it's also the time when small-time developers make their creative offerings available for download.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Film review: Kano - period piece captures spirit of Taiwanese teens' baseball exploits

Film review: Kano - period piece captures spirit of Taiwanese teens' baseball exploits

In Cape No 7 (2008) and Warriors of the Rainbow: Seediq Bale (2011), Taiwanese screenwriter/filmmaker Wei Te-sheng cast his attention towards the period when his country was ruled by Japan (1895-1945). But this time it seems the rose-tinted glasses have somewhat obscured his view of the past.

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm

Album of the Week: Club Meds by Dan Mangan & Blacksmith makes waves

Album of the Week: Club Meds by Dan Mangan & Blacksmith makes waves

Since establishing himself in the Canadian music scene, Vancouver's Dan Mangan has more recently started to make waves further afield. After extensively touring his two critically acclaimed solo albums of charming indie folk, the talented singer-songwriter spread his creative wings on the 2011 album Oh Fortune, collaborating with the city's free-jazz community and garnering a Juno award for his troubles.

 

17 Jan 2015 - 10:20pm