• Tue
  • Sep 2, 2014
  • Updated: 7:39pm

Sport in the People's Republic of China

End China's state-led sports system

The London Olympics have just ended and the memory of Chinese athletes giving their all to win honours is still fresh in our minds. Who can forget Liu Xiang's heart-wrenching fall in the hurdles event?

Thursday, 16 August, 2012, 2:46am

In Brief

Sports body tables fitness legislation to tap Games fever

16 Sep 2008 - 12:00am

Gold for elite athletes, fat chance for the rest

Almost two weeks into the Olympics, China sits atop the medals table and its athletes have never been more popular. But their success has come at a fearsome price.

20 Aug 2008 - 12:00am

Rule on imported athletes goes too far

China has long dominated the world of table tennis. Before panda diplomacy, there was ping-pong diplomacy. This dated back to the 1970s with the warming of relationships between the mainland and the United States, and the exchange of their table tennis stars.

2 Mar 2008 - 12:00am

Sporting premier wins over Japanese

While sport has been used to stir up national rivalries, it has also helped ease strained relations.

The famous ping-pong diplomacy between China and the United States in the 1970s heralded a thaw in Sino-US ties. The two nations have had a frosty relationship since Mao Zedong 's Communist Party came to power in 1949.

4 Jun 2007 - 12:00am

852 days to go

Behind the scenes a sporting project of an astounding scale is quietly taking off, and ultimately tens of millions of people will lace up running shoes as a result. With all the talk about issues such as budgets, air quality, human rights and building projects, the topic of sport often takes a back seat in the run up to the Olympic Games - particularly sport for the masses.

9 Apr 2006 - 12:00am

Finally there

'Friendship first, competition second' was a popular slogan in China in Maoist times, when sport was a tool of foreign policy. The mesmerising performances of the Chinese ping pong team in the 1970s did much to gloss over the nation's serious internal problems and to present it to the outside world as a prosperous socialist nation.

8 Oct 2001 - 12:00am

Brotherly chats give little away

CHINESE Foreign Minister Qian Qichen may hold the key to the Sino-British log jam over the future of Hong Kong, but the only thing his brother knows about the territory is that it is 'small and busy'.

Qian Qiao, the youngest of the Qian family, was in Hong Kong yesterday to promote the 43rd World Table Tennis Championships.

7 Apr 1995 - 12:00am