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Jolly Ting, CEO and chairman

Jolliville seeks new opportunities to develop and transform nation

When Jolliville Holdings modernised the water system of Calapan in Oriental Mindoro, the company did not just pave the way for clean water provisions. It also converted the sleepy town into a bustling city as it became more feasible for investors to set up businesses in the area.

Supported by:Discovery Reports

When Jolliville Holdings modernised the water system of Calapan in Oriental Mindoro, the company did not just pave the way for clean water provisions. It also converted the sleepy town into a bustling city as it became more feasible for investors to set up businesses in the area.

"Before Jolliville intervened, the water in Calapan was dirty, murky and smelly. The mayor approached us and asked for our help in finding investors to improve the water system," says Jolly Ting, CEO and chairman of Jolliville. "It was a challenge looking for investors, so Jolliville subsidised the project because we believed we could make a difference. We are catalysts for economic growth." 

Jolliville initially specialised in water distribution, providing water to small- to medium-sized municipalities. It gradually expanded its scope, evolving into a firm with diversified business interests. Today, Jolliville engages in land banking, property development, water distribution and hydropower generation. It aims to transform the Philippines into one of Asia's most bankable destinations by building on the rich natural resources of the country. 

Aside from Calapan, Jolliville holds the water distribution franchise for the second district of La Union, including the municipality of Agoo. The company is confident that its investment in Agoo will help trigger the urbanisation of this municipality, similar to its success in Calapan. The company aims to expand its reach to cover more municipalities across the Philippines. 

Implementing renewable power projects is another way that Jolliville is laying the foundation to increase investment interest in the country. One such project is the construction of a 10MW mini-hydropower plant in Oriental Mindoro, which can power up to 20,000 households. 

The hydropower plant is slated for completion next year. Stabilising the water and power supply in the Philippines is the first step to attracting more businesses to the country.

"Locally, our capacity is limited, but through regional partnerships, we can definitely do it faster. Together, we can help alleviate power problems in the country and lessen the Philippines' dependence on fuel importation," Ting says. 

Jolliville also aims to showcase the sights the Philippines has to offer. With the help of investors, the company seeks to transform its properties in Mindoro and Manila into tourist hotspots. It is open to joint-venture partnerships to develop white-sand beach properties and mountain resorts to maximise their potential. 

"Jolliville is a very progressive company. We always find opportunities to develop something new that will attract investors to our beautiful country," Ting says.

 

Jolliville Holdings
http://www.joh.ph
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