Jason Y Ng

Born in Hong Kong, Jason is a globe-trotter who spent his entire adult life in Europe, the United States and Canada before settling back in his birthplace to rediscover his roots. He is a full-time lawyer and a freelance writer who raves and rants about Hong Kong and its people. Jason is the bestselling author of HONG KONG State of Mind and No City for Slow Men. Follow him on Twitter @jasonyng.
Jason Y Ng
Born in Hong Kong, Jason is a globe-trotter who spent his entire adult life in Europe, the United States and Canada before settling back in his birthplace to rediscover his roots. He is a full-time lawyer and a freelance writer who raves and rants about Hong Kong and its people. Jason is the bestselling author of HONG KONG State of Mind and No City for Slow Men. Follow him on Twitter @jasonyng.

Latest from Jason Y Ng

Opinion | What France’s ‘yellow vests’ can teach Hong Kong activists about political protests and the use of violence

The French president’s concessions to the violent protesters have reignited debate in Hong Kong about whether peaceful resistance is an effective route towards political change.

11 Dec 2018 - 8:30PM

The French president’s concessions to the violent protesters have reignited debate in Hong Kong about whether peaceful resistance is an effective route towards political change.

What France’s ‘yellow vests’ can teach Hong Kong activists about political protests and the use of violence
Behind bars, Hong Kong political activist Joshua Wong remains in good spirits

A visit with the city’s most famous inmate reveals a very different routine far from the public spotlight.

20 Jul 2018 - 2:55PM

A visit with the city’s most famous inmate reveals a very different routine far from the public spotlight.

Behind bars, Hong Kong political activist Joshua Wong remains in good spirits
Why Hong Kong’s justice minister Rimsky Yuen is so sanguine about joint checkpoint for express rail link
Hong Kong’s youngest political party Demosisto undeterred by a year of false starts and setbacks
Oath-taking pair overplayed their hand, and the damage to Hong Kong is dire
What’s killing Hong Kong bookstores?
Jailed editors and kidnapped booksellers: A cautionary tale for all critics of Beijing
California Fitness was pumped for growth, but not fit for purpose
After Brexit, Hong Kong voters should take a careful look at what our own localist parties are really selling
Baptism of fire for Joshua Wong and his nascent political party
Is the ‘third road’ a political dead end for Hong Kong?
Who were the winners and losers in the New Territories East by-election?
Hong Kong activist’s anti-government tirade goes viral as social media users hail her for voicing Hongkongers’ frustrations
Star Wars, The Force Awakens: how to impress your colleagues when they ask what you think of the latest instalment
Hong Kong's Latest Epidemic: Ridiculitis
Comedy of errors at reform vote leaves pro-Beijing camp red-faced ... but is the joke also on us?
Ultimate cult film: why Mad Max sequel 'Fury Road' lives up to the hype
The death of a duopoly: who wins and who loses after ATV's spectacular fall and TVB's rise
Parallel traders are gone, but for all the wrong reasons
We are Charlie: reflections on the Charlie Hebdo shooting and the free speech debate
To soldier on, be like water
Million dollar question: What’s next for the Umbrella Movement?
First night of Occupy Central: My six hours in Admiralty
From splash to backlash: in defence of the ice bucket challenge
As I see it | Movie reviews: Godzilla and The Amazing Spider-man 2

In Ishiro Honda’s 1954 original, Gojira – from the Japanese words for gorilla and whale – is a sea monster awaken by nuclear radiation and a not-so-subtle metaphor for the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

29 Oct 2018 - 6:27AM

In Ishiro Honda’s 1954 original, Gojira – from the Japanese words for gorilla and whale – is a sea monster awaken by nuclear radiation and a not-so-subtle metaphor for the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

Movie reviews: Godzilla and The Amazing Spider-man 2
Restaurant reviews: A tale of three ramen shops
Why Hong Kong's government should apologise for failing abused domestic workers
Maid in Hong Kong - Part 1
One hundred days of solitude
Retail Review: Abercrombie & Fitch, Eslite Bookstore