Manos Antoninis

Manos Antoninis has been director of the Global Education Monitoring Report at Unesco since 2017, but has been a member of the report team since 2011. The report is an editorially independent, evidence-based annual report published by Unesco, whose mandate is to monitor progress towards the education targets in the new UN Sustainable Development Goals. From Greece, Manos’ prior experience is as a monitoring and evaluation expert in education sector projects in Bangladesh, China, Nigeria, Pakistan and Indonesia. His PhD was a study of technical education and the labour market in Egypt, completed at the Centre for the Study of African Economies of the University of Oxford.
Manos Antoninis
Manos Antoninis has been director of the Global Education Monitoring Report at Unesco since 2017, but has been a member of the report team since 2011. The report is an editorially independent, evidence-based annual report published by Unesco, whose mandate is to monitor progress towards the education targets in the new UN Sustainable Development Goals. From Greece, Manos’ prior experience is as a monitoring and evaluation expert in education sector projects in Bangladesh, China, Nigeria, Pakistan and Indonesia. His PhD was a study of technical education and the labour market in Egypt, completed at the Centre for the Study of African Economies of the University of Oxford.

Latest from Manos Antoninis

Opinion | For China’s migrant children struggling to get into schools, policies may have changed but attitudes haven’t

Policy changes to ease entry barriers are necessary but not sufficient, with new research finding examples of the schools and teachers themselves becoming the new gatekeepers, keeping alive the discrimination.

22 Nov 2018 - 7:22PM

Policy changes to ease entry barriers are necessary but not sufficient, with new research finding examples of the schools and teachers themselves becoming the new gatekeepers, keeping alive the discrimination.

For China’s migrant children struggling to get into schools, policies may have changed but attitudes haven’t