Paul Krugman

Paul Krugman is a professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. Krugman received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2008 for his work on international trade patterns.
Paul Krugman
Paul Krugman is a professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. Krugman received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2008 for his work on international trade patterns.

Latest from Paul Krugman

Opinion | Why are people turning their back on progress, asks Paul Krugman

This is a tale of three money pits. It's also a tale of monetary regress - of the strange determination of many people to turn the clock back on centuries of progress.

29 Dec 2013 - 6:32AM

This is a tale of three money pits. It's also a tale of monetary regress - of the strange determination of many people to turn the clock back on centuries of progress.

Why are people turning their back on progress, asks Paul Krugman
Opinion | Absurd triumphalism of the austerians is one for Stooges

There was, I'm pretty sure, an episode of The Three Stooges in which Curly kept banging his head against a wall. When Moe asked him why, he replied, "Because it feels so good when I stop." Well, I thought it was funny. But I never imagined that Curly's logic would one day become the main rationale that senior finance officials use to defend their disastrous policies.

22 Dec 2013 - 6:30AM

There was, I'm pretty sure, an episode of The Three Stooges in which Curly kept banging his head against a wall. When Moe asked him why, he replied, "Because it feels so good when I stop." Well, I thought it was funny. But I never imagined that Curly's logic would one day become the main rationale that senior finance officials use to defend their disastrous policies.

Absurd triumphalism of the austerians is one for Stooges
Republicans face existential crisis as 30-year conservative agenda approaches its end

We are not having a debt crisis.

It's important to make this point, because I keep seeing articles about the "fiscal cliff" that do, in fact, describe it - often in the headline - as a debt crisis. But it isn't. The US government is having no trouble borrowing to cover its deficit.

3 Jul 2018 - 9:56PM

We are not having a debt crisis.

It's important to make this point, because I keep seeing articles about the "fiscal cliff" that do, in fact, describe it - often in the headline - as a debt crisis. But it isn't. The US government is having no trouble borrowing to cover its deficit.

Republicans face existential crisis as 30-year conservative agenda approaches its end
Are the days of rapid economic growth over?
Austerity not the solution to America's unemployment crisis now
Misguided belief in austerity diverts attention from need for jobs
Opinion | Plutocrats feeling persecuted. Beware!

Robert Benmosche, the chief executive of the American International Group, said something stupid the other day.

29 Sep 2013 - 1:22AM

Robert Benmosche, the chief executive of the American International Group, said something stupid the other day.

Plutocrats feeling persecuted. Beware!
Opinion | Supporters of the gold standard are usually set in their ways

News flash: recent declines in the price of gold, which is off about 17 per cent from its peak, show that this price can go down as well as up. You may consider this an obvious point, but it has come as a rude shock to many small gold investors who imagined it was the safest of all assets.

14 Apr 2013 - 2:15AM

News flash: recent declines in the price of gold, which is off about 17 per cent from its peak, show that this price can go down as well as up. You may consider this an obvious point, but it has come as a rude shock to many small gold investors who imagined it was the safest of all assets.

Supporters of the gold standard are usually set in their ways
Opinion | Austerity frenzy proven to be wrong. So will it be halted?

In this age of information, maths errors can lead to disaster. Nasa's Mars Orbiter crashed because engineers forgot to convert to metric measurements; JPMorgan Chase's "London Whale" venture went bad in part because modellers divided by a sum instead of an average. So, did an Excel coding error destroy the Western world's economies?

21 Apr 2013 - 4:56AM

In this age of information, maths errors can lead to disaster. Nasa's Mars Orbiter crashed because engineers forgot to convert to metric measurements; JPMorgan Chase's "London Whale" venture went bad in part because modellers divided by a sum instead of an average. So, did an Excel coding error destroy the Western world's economies?

Austerity frenzy proven to be wrong. So will it be halted?
Republican crazies scuttle deal with Obama