Advertisement
Advertisement
Rachel Mok
Advertisement

Singer-songwriter Kevin Tsui Ka-ho's latest single is dedicated to his neighbourhood, a place he refers to as "the capital of Hong Kong" - Tai Po.

Coco Lee teams up with producer Chiu Tsang-hei to rework some Canto-pop classics for her debut stadium concert in the city.

Finnish phone manufacturer Nokia launched its built-in app MixRadio on the mainland last month to tap the country's growing music streaming market.

LMF are returning to the stage for their second comeback tour. The band still has something to say, MC Yan tells Rachel Mok.

Chock Ma are not your average headbangers. During the band's rehearsals, you can hear instruments such as the didgeridoo, an indigenous Australian wind instrument, and a mouth harp, an ancient instrument popular in Southeast Asia.

Chock Ma are not your average headbangers. During the band's rehearsals, you can hear instruments such as the didgeridoo, an indigenous Australian wind instrument, and a mouth harp, an ancient instrument popular in Southeast Asia.

Get your dance groove on as the city prepares to host a flurry of festivals to see out the year, writes Rachel Mok.

Just before this interview starts, mainland actress Zhang Jingchu asks for a straw for her drink. But the waitress doesn't quite grasp the Fujian native's Putonghua, so Zhang's make-up artist quickly steps in to interpret.

Just like a shark, Jun Kung is compelled to keep moving forward. From humble beginnings the Macau-born pop star has become one of Hong Kong's most noted musicians. And his next move sees him take on the role of entrepreneur by founding production company MoFo Music. His big idea? To produce Canto-pop that, well, doesn't sound like Canto-pop.

Music lovers, critics as well as performers, have long complained about a soulless Canto-pop scene, where "k songs"- numbers created with karaoke renditions in mind - have come to define the genre.

Actress Zhao Wei went back to school to learn how to direct and graduated with a box office hit. Rachel Mok talks to one of the most influential women in mainland cinema

It happens a lot these days: while commuting to work, you log into your Facebook account with your smartphone and find several friends have shared the same video on their feeds.

The name Esther Eng may not ring a bell with many people, even Chinese film buffs, but S. Louisa Wei is determined to remedy this situation with Golden Gate, Silver Light, her documentary about the pioneering Chinese-American filmmaker that is making its world premiere at this year's Hong Kong International Film Festival.

It's a Saturday evening on Kwun Tong promenade, formerly known as the public cargo working area. Under the flyover stretching alongside it, children are dancing to electro music being played by a DJ. This is the Forgotten Dreams Carnival, an arts and music event originally planned for last year.

Related Topic
LIFE