TSUNG-MEI CHENG

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Private sector must not be allowed a free rein in China's health care
China must solve its daughter deficit

What is most precious in China today? Is it a house, a car or a big bank account? It is none of the above. Arguably, baby girls are what the country needs most. China has one of the world's most highly skewed sex ratios: for every 100 baby girls born in 2009, 119.5 boys were born. By 2011, the ratio had fallen to 117.8 boys for every 100 girls, suggesting a possible decline - an improvement in this instance. But the ratio is still very high by the standards of the developed world.

6 Apr 2013 - 4:01AM

What is most precious in China today? Is it a house, a car or a big bank account? It is none of the above. Arguably, baby girls are what the country needs most. China has one of the world's most highly skewed sex ratios: for every 100 baby girls born in 2009, 119.5 boys were born. By 2011, the ratio had fallen to 117.8 boys for every 100 girls, suggesting a possible decline - an improvement in this instance. But the ratio is still very high by the standards of the developed world.

China must solve its daughter deficit
China's two-in-one fix to improve public health

For the new Chinese government, a task in these times of global economic slowdown will be to match job creation with the growing number of job seekers looking for gainful employment. Here the health-care sector can be of major help.

22 Apr 2013 - 1:58AM

For the new Chinese government, a task in these times of global economic slowdown will be to match job creation with the growing number of job seekers looking for gainful employment. Here the health-care sector can be of major help.

China's two-in-one fix to improve public health