China Resources Group consulted its party body before voting to oppose China Vanke’s restructuring proposal. China Vanke President Yu Liang attends a news conference following the company's annual results in Hong Kong on March 14, 2016. Photo: Reuters China Resources Group consulted its party body before voting to oppose China Vanke’s restructuring proposal. China Vanke President Yu Liang attends a news conference following the company's annual results in Hong Kong on March 14, 2016. Photo: Reuters
China Resources Group consulted its party body before voting to oppose China Vanke’s restructuring proposal. China Vanke President Yu Liang attends a news conference following the company's annual results in Hong Kong on March 14, 2016. Photo: Reuters
Shirley Yam
Opinion

Opinion

Money Matters by Shirley Yam

Regulators’ silence on Communist Party presence in listed state companies is deafening

Hong Kong regulators are doing little to curb the growing influence of Communist Party-affiliated bodies within H-shares and red chips

China Resources Group consulted its party body before voting to oppose China Vanke’s restructuring proposal. China Vanke President Yu Liang attends a news conference following the company's annual results in Hong Kong on March 14, 2016. Photo: Reuters China Resources Group consulted its party body before voting to oppose China Vanke’s restructuring proposal. China Vanke President Yu Liang attends a news conference following the company's annual results in Hong Kong on March 14, 2016. Photo: Reuters
China Resources Group consulted its party body before voting to oppose China Vanke’s restructuring proposal. China Vanke President Yu Liang attends a news conference following the company's annual results in Hong Kong on March 14, 2016. Photo: Reuters
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