A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Stocks climbed after the US and China declared a truce in their trade war, while Treasuries and the dollar fell. Photo: Bloomberg A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Stocks climbed after the US and China declared a truce in their trade war, while Treasuries and the dollar fell. Photo: Bloomberg
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Stocks climbed after the US and China declared a truce in their trade war, while Treasuries and the dollar fell. Photo: Bloomberg
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

The Xi-Trump trade truce may not end in a peace treaty, and markets should prepare accordingly

  • Neal Kimberley says investors can adjust short-term plans, but the pending US tariff hike has only been delayed for 90 days
  • And, even if the trade war is resolved for good, investors may have to prepare for more Fed interest rate rises than expected

A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Stocks climbed after the US and China declared a truce in their trade war, while Treasuries and the dollar fell. Photo: Bloomberg A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Stocks climbed after the US and China declared a truce in their trade war, while Treasuries and the dollar fell. Photo: Bloomberg
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Stocks climbed after the US and China declared a truce in their trade war, while Treasuries and the dollar fell. Photo: Bloomberg
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.