Unlike in other countries, the majority of brownfield sites in Hong Kong are inhabited by operators, as opposed to being abandoned or vacant. Photo: Winson Wong Unlike in other countries, the majority of brownfield sites in Hong Kong are inhabited by operators, as opposed to being abandoned or vacant. Photo: Winson Wong
Unlike in other countries, the majority of brownfield sites in Hong Kong are inhabited by operators, as opposed to being abandoned or vacant. Photo: Winson Wong
Chiu Kam-kuen
Opinion

Opinion

Concrete Analysis by Chiu Kam-kuen

Technology can help create a database to speed up the development of 1,400 hectares of brownfield sites in Hong Kong

  • The government should construct a comprehensive brownfield database and plan for ways to accommodate the existing occupants, writes Chiu Kam-kuen of Cushman & Wakefield
  • Hong Kong could learn from successful overseas schemes like the Thames Gateway Project in London and the Pittsburgh Project in the US

Unlike in other countries, the majority of brownfield sites in Hong Kong are inhabited by operators, as opposed to being abandoned or vacant. Photo: Winson Wong Unlike in other countries, the majority of brownfield sites in Hong Kong are inhabited by operators, as opposed to being abandoned or vacant. Photo: Winson Wong
Unlike in other countries, the majority of brownfield sites in Hong Kong are inhabited by operators, as opposed to being abandoned or vacant. Photo: Winson Wong
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