Data centres were a highly sought-after asset class during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, as the unexpected surge in e-commerce and work-from-home regime sent operators scrambling for space. Photo: Shutterstock Images Data centres were a highly sought-after asset class during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, as the unexpected surge in e-commerce and work-from-home regime sent operators scrambling for space. Photo: Shutterstock Images
Data centres were a highly sought-after asset class during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, as the unexpected surge in e-commerce and work-from-home regime sent operators scrambling for space. Photo: Shutterstock Images
Hannah Jeong
Opinion

Opinion

Concrete Analysis by Hannah Jeong

Demand for data centres is in a lull. The national security law has little to do with it

  • The current lull is caused by misguided perception about looming oversupply over the next few years
  • Hong Kong offers big opportunities given a favourable supply-demand gap, backed by sharp growth in hyperscale and media-content businesses

Data centres were a highly sought-after asset class during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, as the unexpected surge in e-commerce and work-from-home regime sent operators scrambling for space. Photo: Shutterstock Images Data centres were a highly sought-after asset class during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, as the unexpected surge in e-commerce and work-from-home regime sent operators scrambling for space. Photo: Shutterstock Images
Data centres were a highly sought-after asset class during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, as the unexpected surge in e-commerce and work-from-home regime sent operators scrambling for space. Photo: Shutterstock Images
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Hannah Jeong

Hannah Jeong

Hannah Jeong, head of valuation and advisory services at Colliers in Hong Kong