The Central business district of Hong Kong. Stock exchange operators in the city and Singapore are hoping to jump on the SPAC bandwagon, and regulators are considering rewriting their listing rules to allow blank-cheque companies on their bourses. Photo: AFP The Central business district of Hong Kong. Stock exchange operators in the city and Singapore are hoping to jump on the SPAC bandwagon, and regulators are considering rewriting their listing rules to allow blank-cheque companies on their bourses. Photo: AFP
The Central business district of Hong Kong. Stock exchange operators in the city and Singapore are hoping to jump on the SPAC bandwagon, and regulators are considering rewriting their listing rules to allow blank-cheque companies on their bourses. Photo: AFP

Asian investors and targets remain hot on SPACs, as fundraising by blank-cheque companies cools

  • Blank-cheque companies raised nearly US$94 billion in the first quarter, have only taken in US$12 billion since April
  • SEC raised questions about accounting for SPACs in April, putting a chill on global fundraising

Topic |   Banking & Finance
The Central business district of Hong Kong. Stock exchange operators in the city and Singapore are hoping to jump on the SPAC bandwagon, and regulators are considering rewriting their listing rules to allow blank-cheque companies on their bourses. Photo: AFP The Central business district of Hong Kong. Stock exchange operators in the city and Singapore are hoping to jump on the SPAC bandwagon, and regulators are considering rewriting their listing rules to allow blank-cheque companies on their bourses. Photo: AFP
The Central business district of Hong Kong. Stock exchange operators in the city and Singapore are hoping to jump on the SPAC bandwagon, and regulators are considering rewriting their listing rules to allow blank-cheque companies on their bourses. Photo: AFP
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