Chinese Premier Li Keqiang felt obligated during his Macau visit to offer some remedies for a collapse directly induced by his senior colleague’s policies on corruption. Photo: SCMP Pictures Chinese Premier Li Keqiang felt obligated during his Macau visit to offer some remedies for a collapse directly induced by his senior colleague’s policies on corruption. Photo: SCMP Pictures
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang felt obligated during his Macau visit to offer some remedies for a collapse directly induced by his senior colleague’s policies on corruption. Photo: SCMP Pictures
Jake Van Der Kamp
Opinion

Opinion

Jake's View by Jake Van Der Kamp

It will take more than Beijing’s latest remedies to fix Macau’s troubles

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang felt obligated during his Macau visit to offer some remedies for a collapse directly induced by his senior colleague’s policies on corruption. Photo: SCMP Pictures Chinese Premier Li Keqiang felt obligated during his Macau visit to offer some remedies for a collapse directly induced by his senior colleague’s policies on corruption. Photo: SCMP Pictures
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang felt obligated during his Macau visit to offer some remedies for a collapse directly induced by his senior colleague’s policies on corruption. Photo: SCMP Pictures
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Jake Van Der Kamp

Jake Van Der Kamp

Jake van der Kamp is a native of the Netherlands, a Canadian citizen, and a longtime Hong Kong resident. He started as a South China Morning Post business reporter in 1978, soon made a career change to investment analyst and returned to the newspaper in 1998 as a financial columnist.