Architect James Law poses earlier this month inside his work, the "Opod" – a 120-square foot giant water pipe, designed as micro-housing in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters Architect James Law poses earlier this month inside his work, the "Opod" – a 120-square foot giant water pipe, designed as micro-housing in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
Architect James Law poses earlier this month inside his work, the "Opod" – a 120-square foot giant water pipe, designed as micro-housing in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
Richard Wong
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Richard Wong

Rethinking Hong Kong’s future housing policy commitment – rental or ownership?

Hong Kong’s experience is particularly valuable because it has both a private housing market and a non-market public housing sector that adjust to excess demand in different and opposite ways

Architect James Law poses earlier this month inside his work, the "Opod" – a 120-square foot giant water pipe, designed as micro-housing in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters Architect James Law poses earlier this month inside his work, the "Opod" – a 120-square foot giant water pipe, designed as micro-housing in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
Architect James Law poses earlier this month inside his work, the "Opod" – a 120-square foot giant water pipe, designed as micro-housing in Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
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Richard Wong

Richard Wong

Richard Wong Yue-chim is the Philip Wong Kennedy Wong Professor in Political Economy at the University of Hong Kong