A new study suggests that the actual fuel consumption experienced by the average driver is typically 25 per cent higher than what is printed on the car’s sales sticker. Photo: Reuters A new study suggests that the actual fuel consumption experienced by the average driver is typically 25 per cent higher than what is printed on the car’s sales sticker. Photo: Reuters
A new study suggests that the actual fuel consumption experienced by the average driver is typically 25 per cent higher than what is printed on the car’s sales sticker. Photo: Reuters

Carmakers exaggerating fuel efficiency, study shows

Research shows that 'real-world' carbon emissions for new cars based on fuel consumption are about 25pc higher on average than carmakers say

A new study suggests that the actual fuel consumption experienced by the average driver is typically 25 per cent higher than what is printed on the car’s sales sticker. Photo: Reuters A new study suggests that the actual fuel consumption experienced by the average driver is typically 25 per cent higher than what is printed on the car’s sales sticker. Photo: Reuters
A new study suggests that the actual fuel consumption experienced by the average driver is typically 25 per cent higher than what is printed on the car’s sales sticker. Photo: Reuters
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