A cancer patient lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this May 23, 2007 file photo. Helium remains liquid at extremely low temperatures, making it ideal for cooling superconducting magnets used in MRI machines. Photo: Reuters A cancer patient lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this May 23, 2007 file photo. Helium remains liquid at extremely low temperatures, making it ideal for cooling superconducting magnets used in MRI machines. Photo: Reuters
A cancer patient lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this May 23, 2007 file photo. Helium remains liquid at extremely low temperatures, making it ideal for cooling superconducting magnets used in MRI machines. Photo: Reuters

Tech firms, medical research, get helium reprieve in U.S.

A cancer patient lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this May 23, 2007 file photo. Helium remains liquid at extremely low temperatures, making it ideal for cooling superconducting magnets used in MRI machines. Photo: Reuters A cancer patient lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this May 23, 2007 file photo. Helium remains liquid at extremely low temperatures, making it ideal for cooling superconducting magnets used in MRI machines. Photo: Reuters
A cancer patient lies inside a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this May 23, 2007 file photo. Helium remains liquid at extremely low temperatures, making it ideal for cooling superconducting magnets used in MRI machines. Photo: Reuters
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