US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and China's Vice Premier Wang Yang gesture before US- China Comprehensive Economic Dialogue to discuss bilateral economic and trade issues in Washington in July. Photo: Reuters US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and China's Vice Premier Wang Yang gesture before US- China Comprehensive Economic Dialogue to discuss bilateral economic and trade issues in Washington in July. Photo: Reuters
US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and China's Vice Premier Wang Yang gesture before US- China Comprehensive Economic Dialogue to discuss bilateral economic and trade issues in Washington in July. Photo: Reuters
Laura He
Opinion

Opinion

Across The Border by Laura He

China still has ‘extraordinary’ influence on global trade, but its historic advantages start to diminish as automation rises

The world’s two largest economies, the US and China, are deeply intertwined and any potential trade war between the two could cast a major shadow over global fortunes

US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and China's Vice Premier Wang Yang gesture before US- China Comprehensive Economic Dialogue to discuss bilateral economic and trade issues in Washington in July. Photo: Reuters US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and China's Vice Premier Wang Yang gesture before US- China Comprehensive Economic Dialogue to discuss bilateral economic and trade issues in Washington in July. Photo: Reuters
US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and China's Vice Premier Wang Yang gesture before US- China Comprehensive Economic Dialogue to discuss bilateral economic and trade issues in Washington in July. Photo: Reuters
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Laura He

Laura He

Laura covers capital markets and financial affairs in Hong Kong and China, including major IPOs, corporate finance, investment banking, and equity markets, with an eye on technology and innovation for the Post. Previously, she'd worked for MarketWatch and The Wall Street Journal Digital Network in San Francisco and Hong Kong. She has also worked for Forbes in San Francisco and had stints at Xinhua News Agency as economics editor, anchor and financial correspondent in both Beijing and Hong Kong. She has an MA degree in digital journalism from Stanford University and passed CFA exams.