Crude oil prices may trade in a higher range of US$50 to US$70 a barrel or even higher next year, subject to US dollar devaluation. Ditto for gas, says Henry Chan, as he outlines what the world’s economy can expect to get thrown at it, including Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters Crude oil prices may trade in a higher range of US$50 to US$70 a barrel or even higher next year, subject to US dollar devaluation. Ditto for gas, says Henry Chan, as he outlines what the world’s economy can expect to get thrown at it, including Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
Crude oil prices may trade in a higher range of US$50 to US$70 a barrel or even higher next year, subject to US dollar devaluation. Ditto for gas, says Henry Chan, as he outlines what the world’s economy can expect to get thrown at it, including Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters

Banking & Finance

2018 likely to be serious year of reckoning for global economy

The head of research at Caitong International Securities outlines what the world can expect to get thrown at it from the markets next year

Topic |   Banking & Finance
Crude oil prices may trade in a higher range of US$50 to US$70 a barrel or even higher next year, subject to US dollar devaluation. Ditto for gas, says Henry Chan, as he outlines what the world’s economy can expect to get thrown at it, including Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters Crude oil prices may trade in a higher range of US$50 to US$70 a barrel or even higher next year, subject to US dollar devaluation. Ditto for gas, says Henry Chan, as he outlines what the world’s economy can expect to get thrown at it, including Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
Crude oil prices may trade in a higher range of US$50 to US$70 a barrel or even higher next year, subject to US dollar devaluation. Ditto for gas, says Henry Chan, as he outlines what the world’s economy can expect to get thrown at it, including Hong Kong. Photo: Reuters
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