A nurse with a cocktail of drugs for Aids patients at a hospital in Chongqing on November 30, 2008. Combination therapy- the use of two or more drugs to cure a disease - is increasingly being applied in oncology in the medical industry’s quest to fight cancer. Photo: AFP

Big data enters the fray in the war against cancer as pharmaceutical laboratories combine drugs like cocktails to kill cancerous cells

  • Drug cocktails are effective in suppressing HIV/Aids, and combination therapy is increasingly being applied to the battle front in the war on cancer
  • Pharmaceutical companies are using big data analysis and machine learning to identify the most appropriate mix out of millions of possible drug combinations
Topic |   Health & Fitness

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A nurse with a cocktail of drugs for Aids patients at a hospital in Chongqing on November 30, 2008. Combination therapy- the use of two or more drugs to cure a disease - is increasingly being applied in oncology in the medical industry’s quest to fight cancer. Photo: AFP
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A scientist transfers fluids into a tube at the Driver Inc. laboratory in Shantou, China, on Wednesday, August 29, 2018. A pair of Harvard-trained American oncologists behind the startup Driver, backed by Hong Kong billionaire†Li Ka-shing, are attempting to harness technology to revamp cancer care. They're taking some of their earliest steps in China -- cancer's ground zero. Photo: Bloomberg

Can cheaper drugs help home-grown labs turn the table on foreign Big Pharma in China’s cancer treatment market?

  • Nearly a quarter of the world’s newly diagnosed cancer cases in 2015 were in China
  • Lung cancer tops the list of China’s tumours, with the number of cases expected to grow by 40 per cent to 1.26 million by 2030
Topic |   Pharmaceuticals

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A scientist transfers fluids into a tube at the Driver Inc. laboratory in Shantou, China, on Wednesday, August 29, 2018. A pair of Harvard-trained American oncologists behind the startup Driver, backed by Hong Kong billionaire†Li Ka-shing, are attempting to harness technology to revamp cancer care. They're taking some of their earliest steps in China -- cancer's ground zero. Photo: Bloomberg
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