Crew watch as a container is loaded on to a cargo ship in Tokyo. The International Chamber of Shipping estimates that at least 100,000 seafarers a month need to change over from the ships they work on. Photo: Reuters Crew watch as a container is loaded on to a cargo ship in Tokyo. The International Chamber of Shipping estimates that at least 100,000 seafarers a month need to change over from the ships they work on. Photo: Reuters
Crew watch as a container is loaded on to a cargo ship in Tokyo. The International Chamber of Shipping estimates that at least 100,000 seafarers a month need to change over from the ships they work on. Photo: Reuters

Troubles mount for global shipping lines as seafarers are in short supply amid coronavirus travel and quarantine restrictions

  • The International Chamber of Shipping has been lobbying the United Nations to classify 2 million seafarers globally as ‘key’ or ‘essential’ workers
  • Limitations on crew change have the potential to cause serious disruption to the flow of trade, says Guy Platten, secretary general of ICS

Topic |   Transport and logistics
Crew watch as a container is loaded on to a cargo ship in Tokyo. The International Chamber of Shipping estimates that at least 100,000 seafarers a month need to change over from the ships they work on. Photo: Reuters Crew watch as a container is loaded on to a cargo ship in Tokyo. The International Chamber of Shipping estimates that at least 100,000 seafarers a month need to change over from the ships they work on. Photo: Reuters
Crew watch as a container is loaded on to a cargo ship in Tokyo. The International Chamber of Shipping estimates that at least 100,000 seafarers a month need to change over from the ships they work on. Photo: Reuters
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