An electronic stock board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange on Monday, March 2, 2020. Contrary to global conventions, China’s stock market denotes gains and advances in red, using the green colour to show losses and declines. Photo: Bloomberg An electronic stock board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange on Monday, March 2, 2020. Contrary to global conventions, China’s stock market denotes gains and advances in red, using the green colour to show losses and declines. Photo: Bloomberg
An electronic stock board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange on Monday, March 2, 2020. Contrary to global conventions, China’s stock market denotes gains and advances in red, using the green colour to show losses and declines. Photo: Bloomberg

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Shanghai’s exchange is mulling the first revamp of its benchmark stock index in 30 years, bringing it in line with gauges like S&P 500

  • The Shanghai exchange may calculate a company’s market value for the index based on its free float rather than total outstanding shares, bringing it in line with gauges like the S&P 500
  • The exchange is planning to adjust the timing for newly listed stocks to be included in the index and remove some chronically loss-making shares

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An electronic stock board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange on Monday, March 2, 2020. Contrary to global conventions, China’s stock market denotes gains and advances in red, using the green colour to show losses and declines. Photo: Bloomberg An electronic stock board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange on Monday, March 2, 2020. Contrary to global conventions, China’s stock market denotes gains and advances in red, using the green colour to show losses and declines. Photo: Bloomberg
An electronic stock board at the Shanghai Stock Exchange on Monday, March 2, 2020. Contrary to global conventions, China’s stock market denotes gains and advances in red, using the green colour to show losses and declines. Photo: Bloomberg
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