A Chinese investor uses his smartphone as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing on November 19, 2019. Contrary to global conventions, China uses red to denote gains and advances, green to indicate declines and losses. Photo: AP A Chinese investor uses his smartphone as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing on November 19, 2019. Contrary to global conventions, China uses red to denote gains and advances, green to indicate declines and losses. Photo: AP
A Chinese investor uses his smartphone as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing on November 19, 2019. Contrary to global conventions, China uses red to denote gains and advances, green to indicate declines and losses. Photo: AP

World’s largest hedge fund is doing far better in China than elsewhere, as Dalio’s Bridgewater returns 22 per cent to investors

  • Bridgewater Associates raised about 900 million yuan for its second China fund in September, doubling its assets
  • Bridgewater’s All Weather China strategy fund boasted an annualised return of about 22 per cent for the 22 months from inception to the end of July

Topic |   Wealth management
A Chinese investor uses his smartphone as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing on November 19, 2019. Contrary to global conventions, China uses red to denote gains and advances, green to indicate declines and losses. Photo: AP A Chinese investor uses his smartphone as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing on November 19, 2019. Contrary to global conventions, China uses red to denote gains and advances, green to indicate declines and losses. Photo: AP
A Chinese investor uses his smartphone as he monitors stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing on November 19, 2019. Contrary to global conventions, China uses red to denote gains and advances, green to indicate declines and losses. Photo: AP
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