An undated photograph of the CMA-CGM Group's 23,000-TEU container ship Jacques Saade, which is powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), at the Shanghai Jiangnan-Changxing Shipyard. Photo: Handout An undated photograph of the CMA-CGM Group's 23,000-TEU container ship Jacques Saade, which is powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), at the Shanghai Jiangnan-Changxing Shipyard. Photo: Handout
An undated photograph of the CMA-CGM Group's 23,000-TEU container ship Jacques Saade, which is powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), at the Shanghai Jiangnan-Changxing Shipyard. Photo: Handout
Energy

Ship orders slump as owners dither over ammonia, hydrogen, biofuels or electrification to replace marine bunker fuel

  • Ammonia, hydrogen, biofuels and electrification are some of the many contenders to power the world’s future merchant fleet, but most are only in the trial stage
  • With the life of a commercial ship averaging around 20 years, opting for a technology that doesn’t take off could be very costly

Topic |   Energy
An undated photograph of the CMA-CGM Group's 23,000-TEU container ship Jacques Saade, which is powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), at the Shanghai Jiangnan-Changxing Shipyard. Photo: Handout An undated photograph of the CMA-CGM Group's 23,000-TEU container ship Jacques Saade, which is powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), at the Shanghai Jiangnan-Changxing Shipyard. Photo: Handout
An undated photograph of the CMA-CGM Group's 23,000-TEU container ship Jacques Saade, which is powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG), at the Shanghai Jiangnan-Changxing Shipyard. Photo: Handout
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