A Nayuki store in Beijing. The company fell 13.5 per cent on its debut in Hong Kong recently despite being the first milk tea stock in the world. Photo: Reuters A Nayuki store in Beijing. The company fell 13.5 per cent on its debut in Hong Kong recently despite being the first milk tea stock in the world. Photo: Reuters
A Nayuki store in Beijing. The company fell 13.5 per cent on its debut in Hong Kong recently despite being the first milk tea stock in the world. Photo: Reuters
Consumers

Chinese milk tea firms face bubble amid over competition, fast-changing consumer preferences

  • Amid an increase in new players, only 18.8 per cent of milk tea firms survived for more than a year in 2019
  • Hot money is causing a bubble and firms need to improve products and services, iiMedia Research says

Topic |   Consumers
A Nayuki store in Beijing. The company fell 13.5 per cent on its debut in Hong Kong recently despite being the first milk tea stock in the world. Photo: Reuters A Nayuki store in Beijing. The company fell 13.5 per cent on its debut in Hong Kong recently despite being the first milk tea stock in the world. Photo: Reuters
A Nayuki store in Beijing. The company fell 13.5 per cent on its debut in Hong Kong recently despite being the first milk tea stock in the world. Photo: Reuters
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