Traders on the phone on 20 June 2002 at the Sao Paulo Stock Exchange (Bovespa) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Rating agency Moody's Investors Service said 20 June 2002 it had cut its outlook for Brazil's foreign currency credit ratings to "negative" from "stable" because of deteriorating investor sentiment. Investors' confidence has been undermined by "perceived uncertainties associated with the outcome of the October election," the agency said, "despite the present government's maintenance of a sound macroeconomic policy mix." Photo AFP
William Pesek
Opinion

Opinion

William Pesek

This week, stay close to a phone as global central bankers gather to find a solution to market crisis

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Traders on the phone on 20 June 2002 at the Sao Paulo Stock Exchange (Bovespa) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Rating agency Moody's Investors Service said 20 June 2002 it had cut its outlook for Brazil's foreign currency credit ratings to "negative" from "stable" because of deteriorating investor sentiment. Investors' confidence has been undermined by "perceived uncertainties associated with the outcome of the October election," the agency said, "despite the present government's maintenance of a sound macroeconomic policy mix." Photo AFP
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