In this December 6, 2013 photo, a staff member checks a bitcoin mining computer at Landminers in Chongqing. China is home to the world’s largest cryptocurrency mines, eager to make use of the country’s abundantly cheap electricity charges. Photo: Chinatopix

It takes 556 days of computing and a hefty electricity bill to mine a single bitcoin. Is it worth it?

The prices of crypto mining computers have risen with soaring bitcoin prices, prompting some enthusiasts to mine for Ethereum and other alternatives

Topic |   Bitcoin

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In this December 6, 2013 photo, a staff member checks a bitcoin mining computer at Landminers in Chongqing. China is home to the world’s largest cryptocurrency mines, eager to make use of the country’s abundantly cheap electricity charges. Photo: Chinatopix
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Amanda Lee

Amanda Lee

Beijing-based correspondent Amanda Lee covers markets and the economy for the Post, with an interest in China's economic and social landscape. A graduate of the London School of Economics, she joined the Post in 2017 and has previously worked for Thomson Reuters and Forbes.

Josh Ye

Josh Ye

Josh is a reporter at Abacus. He was previously a reporter and a video producer for the South China Morning Post. Graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a major in English and philosophy, he's now pursuing a law degree at the University of Hong Kong. Outside of work, he's a pop culture junkie, an avid listener of audiobooks and a huge fan of American sports.