The idea that reading a book about two male penguins is somehow going to "turn a child gay" is irrational. Photo: Xinhua The idea that reading a book about two male penguins is somehow going to "turn a child gay" is irrational. Photo: Xinhua
The idea that reading a book about two male penguins is somehow going to "turn a child gay" is irrational. Photo: Xinhua
Kelly Yang
Opinion

Opinion

Kelly Yang

Singapore's censorship of children's book defies reality of alternative lifestyles

Kelly Yang says to teach acceptance, we should celebrate books about non-traditional families, not censor them as Singapore did

The idea that reading a book about two male penguins is somehow going to "turn a child gay" is irrational. Photo: Xinhua The idea that reading a book about two male penguins is somehow going to "turn a child gay" is irrational. Photo: Xinhua
The idea that reading a book about two male penguins is somehow going to "turn a child gay" is irrational. Photo: Xinhua
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Kelly Yang

Kelly Yang

Kelly Yang is the founder of The Kelly Yang Project, an after-school writing program for children in Hong Kong. At KYP, she teaches creative writing, public speaking and critical reasoning. She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and Harvard Law School. Follow Kelly on Twitter: @kellyyanghk