Election banners fly in North Point in the run-up to the 2012 Legco election. A record 67 lists of candidates competed for 35 directly elected seats in the election. That record is almost certain to be broken this year. Photo: Sam Tsang Election banners fly in North Point in the run-up to the 2012 Legco election. A record 67 lists of candidates competed for 35 directly elected seats in the election. That record is almost certain to be broken this year. Photo: Sam Tsang
Election banners fly in North Point in the run-up to the 2012 Legco election. A record 67 lists of candidates competed for 35 directly elected seats in the election. That record is almost certain to be broken this year. Photo: Sam Tsang
Gary Cheung
Opinion

Opinion

Gary Cheung

How a simple change could keep fringe candidates out of Hong Kong’s legislature, and ease political tensions

Gary Cheung says the ‘largest-remaining’ method, which allocates seats in our election system, needs revamping to avoid an increasingly debilitating division in the Legislative Council

Election banners fly in North Point in the run-up to the 2012 Legco election. A record 67 lists of candidates competed for 35 directly elected seats in the election. That record is almost certain to be broken this year. Photo: Sam Tsang Election banners fly in North Point in the run-up to the 2012 Legco election. A record 67 lists of candidates competed for 35 directly elected seats in the election. That record is almost certain to be broken this year. Photo: Sam Tsang
Election banners fly in North Point in the run-up to the 2012 Legco election. A record 67 lists of candidates competed for 35 directly elected seats in the election. That record is almost certain to be broken this year. Photo: Sam Tsang
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Gary Cheung

Gary Cheung

Gary Cheung joined the Post in 2000, covering fields ranging from politics and the integration between Hong Kong and China. He became assistant editor-in-chief of Ming Pao in 2017 and returned to the Post the following year. He is author of Hong Kong’s Watershed: The 1967 riots (Hong Kong University Press, 2009).