Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a rally in Aston, Pennsylvania. All leaders who want to get elected or stay in power know that one of the best ways to do so is to appeal to emotions. Photo: Reuters Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a rally in Aston, Pennsylvania. All leaders who want to get elected or stay in power know that one of the best ways to do so is to appeal to emotions. Photo: Reuters
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a rally in Aston, Pennsylvania. All leaders who want to get elected or stay in power know that one of the best ways to do so is to appeal to emotions. Photo: Reuters

The secret of snake oil salesman Donald Trump’s success

Paul Stapleton says his popularity, implausible as it seems, can be explained by a cognitive bias within us that makes us susceptible to emotional appeals

Topic |   US election 2016: Analysis
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a rally in Aston, Pennsylvania. All leaders who want to get elected or stay in power know that one of the best ways to do so is to appeal to emotions. Photo: Reuters Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a rally in Aston, Pennsylvania. All leaders who want to get elected or stay in power know that one of the best ways to do so is to appeal to emotions. Photo: Reuters
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at a rally in Aston, Pennsylvania. All leaders who want to get elected or stay in power know that one of the best ways to do so is to appeal to emotions. Photo: Reuters
READ FULL ARTICLE