Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton face off in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 9. The US presidential debates have revealed the full extent of a world in existential crisis, where people don’t know who or what to trust. Photo: AP

In a world racked by radical change, we need a new philosophy of common identity

Andrew Sheng says globalisation is receding amid toxic politics, rising mistrust and conflict, and a new narrative is the only way to restore a sense of balance and counter the insecurity

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Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton face off in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 9. The US presidential debates have revealed the full extent of a world in existential crisis, where people don’t know who or what to trust. Photo: AP
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Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng

Andrew Sheng is a former central banker and financial regulator, currently distinguished fellow at the Asia Global Institute, University of Hong Kong. He writes widely on Asian perspectives on global issues, with columns in Project Syndicate, Asia News Network and Caijing/Caixin magazines. His latest book is “Shadow Banking in China”, co-authored with Ng Chow Soon, published by Wiley.