A giant image of Kim Jong-un and confetti appear at the end of a concert at Pyongyang Arena in the North Korean capital. Washington has not engaged the North Korean ruler since he took power in 2011. Even Beijing has had a testy relationship with him. Photo: Washington Post

US concessions on Korean peninsula could go a long way

John Barry Kotch says some flexibility on THAAD and other related issues by the US and others would better serve the common cause of curbing North Korea’s nuclear ambitions

Topic |   Korean peninsula

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A giant image of Kim Jong-un and confetti appear at the end of a concert at Pyongyang Arena in the North Korean capital. Washington has not engaged the North Korean ruler since he took power in 2011. Even Beijing has had a testy relationship with him. Photo: Washington Post
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John Barry Kotch

John Barry Kotch

John Barry Kotch lived and worked in Asia for more than a decade as an instructor at LG Academy and visiting professor at Hanyang University’s Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul. Earlier, he served with the UN Command as an intelligence adviser to the South Korean Air Force, as a State Department consultant on Korea and special assistant at the Agency for International Development in Washington, D.C. More recently, he was senior adviser and writer at the Pacific Basin Economic Council in Hong Kong. Dr Kotch holds an MBA in international business and a PhD in political science from Columbia University.