Pyongyang residents watch news of their country’s sixth nuclear test on September 3, from a video screen installed on Mirae Scientists Street in Pyongyang. There are more than a few people, including in South Korea, who may loathe the Kim family regime but admire Pyongyang’s refusal to give in to US pressure to abandon its missile and nuclear programme. Photo: AFP

From Trump’s America to communist China, contempt for history is on the rise

Philip Bowring laments the wider trend of people in power wilfully ignoring or excising bits of history to suit their own purposes. The North Korean nuclear crisis is one consequence of such disregard for facts

Topic |   North Korea nuclear crisis

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Pyongyang residents watch news of their country’s sixth nuclear test on September 3, from a video screen installed on Mirae Scientists Street in Pyongyang. There are more than a few people, including in South Korea, who may loathe the Kim family regime but admire Pyongyang’s refusal to give in to US pressure to abandon its missile and nuclear programme. Photo: AFP
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Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring

Philip Bowring has been based in Asia for 39 years writing on regional financial and political issues. He has been a columnist for the South China Morning Post since the mid-1990s and for the International Herald Tribune from 1992 to 2011. He also contributes regularly to the Wall Street Journal, www.asiasentinel.com, a website of which he is a founder, and elsewhere. Prior to 1992 he was with the weekly Far Eastern Economic Review, latterly as editor.