Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull attend a signing ceremony in Canberra in March 2017. Australia under Turnbull has been one of the Asia-Pacific powers that is most anxious about China’s rise, but efforts to strengthen ties with a Donald Trump-led US have also been fraught. Photo: EPA
Michael Fullilove
Opinion

Opinion

Michael Fullilove

US remains the top power in Asia but for how long, as Trump erodes vital alliances?

Michael Fullilove and Hervé Lemahieu say China is rapidly gaining on the US as an Asian regional power, and the Trump administration’s mismanagement of trade and diplomatic ties in the region threatens its most significant advantage

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Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull attend a signing ceremony in Canberra in March 2017. Australia under Turnbull has been one of the Asia-Pacific powers that is most anxious about China’s rise, but efforts to strengthen ties with a Donald Trump-led US have also been fraught. Photo: EPA
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Michael Fullilove

Michael Fullilove

Michael Fullilove is executive director of the Lowy Institute.

Hervé Lemahieu

Hervé Lemahieu

Hervé Lemahieu is director of the Asian Power and Diplomacy Programme at the Lowy Institute in Sydney. His work analyses and quantifies shifts in the geo-economics, military balance, and diplomatic networks of Asia. In 2018, he launched the Lowy Institute Asia Power Index, a data driven assessment of the regional distribution of power. Hervé joined Lowy from the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies where he was research associate for political economy and security specialising in Southeast Asia. He has an MSc in global governance and diplomacy from the University of Oxford, and an MA in international relations and modern history from the University of St Andrews.