The French – whether native-born or immigrant – join in a celebration on the Champs-Elysee avenue in Paris on July 16 to welcome the national football team’s return after winning the World Cup in Russia. This is the vision of immigration and inclusive nationalism societies should be working towards. Photo: AFP
Jason Furman
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Jason Furman

The evidence is clear: anti-immigration is bad for economic growth

Jason Furman says the economic case for being open to immigrants is indisputable, particularly in ageing societies. Advanced societies now grappling with the rise of populist nationalism must work towards an inclusive vision – or pay the economic price

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The French – whether native-born or immigrant – join in a celebration on the Champs-Elysee avenue in Paris on July 16 to welcome the national football team’s return after winning the World Cup in Russia. This is the vision of immigration and inclusive nationalism societies should be working towards. Photo: AFP
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