A Hong Kong court ruled that allowing mainland Chinese officers to apply national laws at the city’s new cross-border rail terminus was consistent with its mini-constitution. Photo: Roy Issa A Hong Kong court ruled that allowing mainland Chinese officers to apply national laws at the city’s new cross-border rail terminus was consistent with its mini-constitution. Photo: Roy Issa
A Hong Kong court ruled that allowing mainland Chinese officers to apply national laws at the city’s new cross-border rail terminus was consistent with its mini-constitution. Photo: Roy Issa
SCMP Editorial
Opinion

Opinion

SCMP Editorial

Co-location ruling gives needed clarity to important legal issues

  • Doubts have been raised about the compatibility of the arrangement with Hong Kong’s Basic Law
  • The judge adopted a pragmatic approach in making his decision

A Hong Kong court ruled that allowing mainland Chinese officers to apply national laws at the city’s new cross-border rail terminus was consistent with its mini-constitution. Photo: Roy Issa A Hong Kong court ruled that allowing mainland Chinese officers to apply national laws at the city’s new cross-border rail terminus was consistent with its mini-constitution. Photo: Roy Issa
A Hong Kong court ruled that allowing mainland Chinese officers to apply national laws at the city’s new cross-border rail terminus was consistent with its mini-constitution. Photo: Roy Issa
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SCMP Editorial

SCMP Editorial

Editorials represent the views of the South China Morning Post on the issues of the day.