District councillors and other Hongkongers take part in a protest on February 10 against the one-way permit scheme allowing mainlanders to settle in Hong Kong. The current debate only focuses on the negatives of the scheme, ignoring the positives. Photo: Nora Tam District councillors and other Hongkongers take part in a protest on February 10 against the one-way permit scheme allowing mainlanders to settle in Hong Kong. The current debate only focuses on the negatives of the scheme, ignoring the positives. Photo: Nora Tam
District councillors and other Hongkongers take part in a protest on February 10 against the one-way permit scheme allowing mainlanders to settle in Hong Kong. The current debate only focuses on the negatives of the scheme, ignoring the positives. Photo: Nora Tam
Paul Yip
Opinion

Opinion

Paul Yip

Mainland migrants are needed in Hong Kong. The city should not scrap the one-way permit scheme, but improve it

  • The criticism directed at the mainland migrants in our midst is based on half-truths and prejudice, and should not be the basis of our policy. The scheme should stay, both for humanistic and practical reasons, but we should address genuine concerns

District councillors and other Hongkongers take part in a protest on February 10 against the one-way permit scheme allowing mainlanders to settle in Hong Kong. The current debate only focuses on the negatives of the scheme, ignoring the positives. Photo: Nora Tam District councillors and other Hongkongers take part in a protest on February 10 against the one-way permit scheme allowing mainlanders to settle in Hong Kong. The current debate only focuses on the negatives of the scheme, ignoring the positives. Photo: Nora Tam
District councillors and other Hongkongers take part in a protest on February 10 against the one-way permit scheme allowing mainlanders to settle in Hong Kong. The current debate only focuses on the negatives of the scheme, ignoring the positives. Photo: Nora Tam
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Paul Yip

Paul Yip

Paul Yip is the founding director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong, and a professor at the university's Department of Social Work and Social Administration. His interests include suicide prevention, population health and poverty research. He serves as the secretary general of the Asian Population Association and the research chair of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. He was a part-time member of the Central Policy Unit and a member of the Hong Kong government's Steering Committee on Population Policy.